Reblogs Feminism Socialism Equality Sexual Racial & Religious Freedom
http://twitter.com/#!/Dansesouslalune

allthecanadianpolitics:

demandreason:

1181 Aboriginal Women have been murdered or gone missing in Canada in the past 30 years. 

Please Reblog. 

Don’t forget that the Federal government has refused to start an inquiry into missing and murdered aborginal women in this country. This is tragic.

(Source: tomasczt)

softboycollective:

thebluelip-blondie:

my white protesters please remember that you’re rarely at the same risk we are when you stand up for what is right

I’m not gonna stop reblogging these reminders

softboycollective:

thebluelip-blondie:

my white protesters please remember that you’re rarely at the same risk we are when you stand up for what is right

I’m not gonna stop reblogging these reminders

(Source: cartoonpolitics)

la-xingada:

The LAPD beat a Omar Abrego for 10 minute, he dies 12 hours later of his injuries.

but don’t forget that the cops were also “injured”:

"One police suffers of a knee injury while the other has a fractured hand" that he used to punch Abrego.

This has got to stop. 

famphic:

postracialcomments:

soulrevision:

You WILL want to watch this.

In the early morning hours on 8/16/2014 in Ferguson, MO, Greg Thomas spoke with VICE about Ferguson, structural racism, media bias and more!!!

Please reblog & signal boost so we can get this truth out!!

Greg Thomas can be found on twitter, here: Minossec

#Ferguson #MikeBrown

Spread this!!!!

From 2:00 onwards:

The St. Louis Dispatch, they did a thing where, yesterday, they went over to Florissant and asked white people in Starbucks, “What do you think about what’s going on in Ferguson?” First off, most of them weren’t even watching the news and had no idea what happened, but they knew a boy was killed, and their reaction was, “Well, what did he do to deserve it? I know he did something.”

That is embedded in the system. That is embedded within white privilege, and within the country itself: that people are bad because they deserve it.

We have this whole Puritanical system that is set up from the people who got kicked out of England for being too radical…that people who have bad things happen to them deserve it. So, we must’ve deserved slavery. We must’ve deserved Jim Crow. We must’ve deserved 100:1 crack laws. We must’ve deserved the war on drugs. We must’ve deserved racial policing. So now, if you have that mentality about black people, and it gets passed on from person to person, generation to generation, that black people deserve what happened to them, then, when you go ask them, there’s not questions. It’s, “Well, wrong happened to them, so they must’ve deserved it.”

Incredible. Please watch this.

(Source: youtube.com)

westafricanwomen:

sancophaleague:

"Ola Orekunrin was studying to become a doctor in the UK a few years ago when her younger sister fell seriously ill while traveling in Nigeria. The 12-year-old girl, who’d gone to the West African country on holiday with relatives, needed urgent care but the nearest hospital couldn’t deal with her condition.

Orekunrin and her family immediately began looking for an air ambulance service to rapidly transport the girl, a sickle cell anemia sufferer, to a more suitable healthcare facility. They searched all across West Africa but were stunned to find out there was none in the whole region.

"The nearest one at the time was in South Africa," remembers Orekunrin. "They had a 12-hour activation time so by the time they were ready to activate, my sister was dead." (Cnn.com)

Orekunrin did the latter. Motivated by the tragic death of her sister, the young doctor decided to leave behind a high-flying job in the UK to take to the Nigerian skies and address the vital issue of urgent healthcare in Africa’s most populous country.

Flying helicopters, speaking Japanese

At 27, there isn’t much Orekunrin hasn’t achieved.

She is England’s Youngest Doctor.

Born in London, she grew up in a foster home in the charming seaside town of Lowestoft in the south-east of England.

Aged 21, Orekunrin had already graduated from the University of York as a qualified doctor. She was then awarded the MEXT Japanese Government Scholarship and moved to Japan to conduct research in the field of regenerative medicine.

After moving back to Europe the young doctor looked set for a promising career in medicine in the UK. But her desire to improve healthcare services in West Africa brought her back to her roots.

Orekunrin quit her job, sold her assets and went on to study evacuation models and air ambulance services in other developing countries before launching her ambitious venture, which enables her to combine her “deep love for medicine and Africa” with her growing passion for flying — Orekunrin is also a also a trainee helicopter pilot.” (CNN.COM)

Stand FOR SOMETHING!!!

Post Put together by @solar_innerg

#sancophaleague #BlackWomen #Nigeria #Orekunrin #Doctor #Success #blackexcellence

More West African women here

beautiesofafrique:

Elected and appointed African female heads of state

1. Monique Ohsan Bellepeau, Acting President, 31 March 2012 - 21 July 2012 (Mauritius)

2. Joyce Banda, President, 7 April 2012 - 31 May 2014 (Malawi)

3. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, President, 16 January 2006 - Incumbent (Liberia)

4. Ruth Sando Perry, Chairperson of the Council of State, 3 September 1996 - 2 August 1997 (Liberia)

5. Carmen Pereira, Acting President, 14 May 1984 - 16 May 1984 (Guinea-Bissau)

6. Rose Francine Rogombé, Acting President, 10 June 2009 - 16 October 2009 (Gabon)

7. Catherine Samba-Panza., Acting President, 23 January 2014 - Incumbent (Central African Republic)

8. Sylvie Kinigi, Acting President, 27 October 1993 - 5 February 1994 (Burundi)

 

medievalpoc:

aresnergal:

medievalpoc:

lyricsja:


EUROPEANS TAUGHT FOR CENTURIES that Africa had no written history, literature or philosophy (claiming Egypt was other than African). When roughly 1 MILLION manuscripts were found in Timbuktu/Mali covering , according to Reuters “all the fields of human knowledge: law, the sciences, medicine,” IT DID NOT MAKE MAINSTREAM NEWS as did the lies taught by Europeans concerning Africa


Someone asked me to somehow “verify” that this story is real.
Of course it’s real! The PROBLEM with the coverage regarding these manuscripts is that they’re constantly portrayed as being in “danger” because many of them are still in the possession of Malian descendants. About 700,000 have been cataloged so far, and they have had to be moved in part because apparently extremist groups have tried to firebomb them. Many others are still in the possession of the families they have been passed down in.
Some of these collected manuscripts are being housed in exile, but mold and humidity have been a constant threat. They have been raising funds to try and preserve these manuscripts-you can read more about the project to house and protect them here.
A bit of the history of these manuscripts from National Geographic:


These sacred manuscripts covered an array of subjects: astronomy, medicine, mathematics, chemistry, judicial law, government, and Islamic conflict resolution. Islamic study during this period of human history, when the intellectual evolution had stalled in the rest of Europe was growing, evolving, and breaking new ground in the fields of science, mathematics, astronomy, law, and philosophy within the Muslim world.
By the 1300s the “Ambassadors of Peace” centered around the University of Timbuktu created roving scholastic campuses and religious schools of learning that traveled between the cities of Timbuktu, Gao, and Djénné, helping to serve as a model of peaceful governance throughout an often conflict-riddled tribal region.
 At its peak, over 25,000 students attended the University of Timbuktu. 
By the beginning of the 1600s with the Moroccan invasions from the north, however, the scholars of Timbuktu began to slowly drift away and study elsewhere. As a result, the city’s sacred manuscripts began to fall into disrepair. While Islamic teachings there continued for another 300 years, the biggest decline in scholastic study occurred with the French colonization of present-day Mali in the late 1890s. 


So yeah, basically the story of this collection’s source more or less ends with “…but unfortunately, colonialism”, as do most of the great cities of Africa, the Americas, and some parts of Asia.
Also, as an additional consideration:


With the pressures of poverty, a series of droughts, and a tribal Tureg rebellion in Mali that lasted over ten years, the manuscripts continue to disappear into the black market, where they are illegally sold to private and university collections in Europe and the United States. 


Notice where the blame is placed here via language use: on the people in poverty forced to sell their treasures, as opposed to the Universities in Europe and the U.S. buying them.
It’s really just another face of Neocolonialism.

Fun fact: I only learned about that library by playing one of the Civilization games where it exists as a wonder

One of the many reasons why Medievalpoc is also about representation in all types of media.
One of the most important ways the past affects us all today is the media we create about it. History is a story, and a story bears the mark of each teller it passes through. So, each time we tell a story, we have the power to shape it as it passes through us, to others.
Whether we’re writing textbooks, fiction, or articles; sharing something on Facebook, teaching a class, playing a game, or texting our moms, we make choices in how we phrase things and frame information. When you hold things in your mind, like the Library of Timbuktu, and think about how it interacts with everything else you know, it will affect your words and behavior, which in turn affects the people around you.
As I wrote about yesterday, Colonialism in many ways involves telling lies about entire nations and peoples, and using power, ruthlessness, and brutality to make them into almost-truths. After all, if you burn the manuscripts of an entire people and then tell them they have no history; if you make teaching what remains of their history illegal, is that not violence? Is that not genocide?
I’m sure there are those who would call that an exaggeration or hyperbole, but these are often the selfsame folks who are moved to violence to defend the idea the European history is populated entirely and without exception by people we in the U.S. would consider white today. We can pretend all we like that this vision of an all-white historical Europe came from nothing, no one, and nowhere, as if it is undiluted truth that comes to us untainted by centuries of colonialism. But the facts are that you can point to specific moments, authors, and articles that show the turning points; that show these ideas being born. You can read Race Mixture in the Roman Empire by Frank Tenney (from 1916) and see how articles like these shaped American views of race in antiquity; how the racism of 1916 was imposed onto Classical Antiquity. And these are the same people who decided that an entire continent did not have books, had no written history.
Why do we know what we know? Where does it come from? And how does the media we are creating today reflect it?

medievalpoc:

aresnergal:

medievalpoc:

lyricsja:

EUROPEANS TAUGHT FOR CENTURIES that Africa had no written history, literature or philosophy (claiming Egypt was other than African). When roughly 1 MILLION manuscripts were found in Timbuktu/Mali covering , according to Reuters “all the fields of human knowledge: law, the sciences, medicine,” IT DID NOT MAKE MAINSTREAM NEWS as did the lies taught by Europeans concerning Africa

Someone asked me to somehow “verify” that this story is real.

Of course it’s real! The PROBLEM with the coverage regarding these manuscripts is that they’re constantly portrayed as being in “danger” because many of them are still in the possession of Malian descendants. About 700,000 have been cataloged so far, and they have had to be moved in part because apparently extremist groups have tried to firebomb them. Many others are still in the possession of the families they have been passed down in.

Some of these collected manuscripts are being housed in exile, but mold and humidity have been a constant threat. They have been raising funds to try and preserve these manuscripts-you can read more about the project to house and protect them here.

A bit of the history of these manuscripts from National Geographic:

These sacred manuscripts covered an array of subjects: astronomy, medicine, mathematics, chemistry, judicial law, government, and Islamic conflict resolution. Islamic study during this period of human history, when the intellectual evolution had stalled in the rest of Europe was growing, evolving, and breaking new ground in the fields of science, mathematics, astronomy, law, and philosophy within the Muslim world.

By the 1300s the “Ambassadors of Peace” centered around the University of Timbuktu created roving scholastic campuses and religious schools of learning that traveled between the cities of Timbuktu, Gao, and Djénné, helping to serve as a model of peaceful governance throughout an often conflict-riddled tribal region.

At its peak, over 25,000 students attended the University of Timbuktu.

By the beginning of the 1600s with the Moroccan invasions from the north, however, the scholars of Timbuktu began to slowly drift away and study elsewhere. As a result, the city’s sacred manuscripts began to fall into disrepair. While Islamic teachings there continued for another 300 years, the biggest decline in scholastic study occurred with the French colonization of present-day Mali in the late 1890s.

So yeah, basically the story of this collection’s source more or less ends with “…but unfortunately, colonialism”, as do most of the great cities of Africa, the Americas, and some parts of Asia.

Also, as an additional consideration:

With the pressures of poverty, a series of droughts, and a tribal Tureg rebellion in Mali that lasted over ten years, the manuscripts continue to disappear into the black market, where they are illegally sold to private and university collections in Europe and the United States.

Notice where the blame is placed here via language use: on the people in poverty forced to sell their treasures, as opposed to the Universities in Europe and the U.S. buying them.

It’s really just another face of Neocolonialism.

Fun fact: I only learned about that library by playing one of the Civilization games where it exists as a wonder

One of the many reasons why Medievalpoc is also about representation in all types of media.

One of the most important ways the past affects us all today is the media we create about it. History is a story, and a story bears the mark of each teller it passes through. So, each time we tell a story, we have the power to shape it as it passes through us, to others.

Whether we’re writing textbooks, fiction, or articles; sharing something on Facebook, teaching a class, playing a game, or texting our moms, we make choices in how we phrase things and frame information. When you hold things in your mind, like the Library of Timbuktu, and think about how it interacts with everything else you know, it will affect your words and behavior, which in turn affects the people around you.

As I wrote about yesterday, Colonialism in many ways involves telling lies about entire nations and peoples, and using power, ruthlessness, and brutality to make them into almost-truths. After all, if you burn the manuscripts of an entire people and then tell them they have no history; if you make teaching what remains of their history illegal, is that not violence? Is that not genocide?

I’m sure there are those who would call that an exaggeration or hyperbole, but these are often the selfsame folks who are moved to violence to defend the idea the European history is populated entirely and without exception by people we in the U.S. would consider white today. We can pretend all we like that this vision of an all-white historical Europe came from nothing, no one, and nowhere, as if it is undiluted truth that comes to us untainted by centuries of colonialism. But the facts are that you can point to specific moments, authors, and articles that show the turning points; that show these ideas being born. You can read Race Mixture in the Roman Empire by Frank Tenney (from 1916) and see how articles like these shaped American views of race in antiquity; how the racism of 1916 was imposed onto Classical Antiquity. And these are the same people who decided that an entire continent did not have books, had no written history.

Why do we know what we know? Where does it come from? And how does the media we are creating today reflect it?

mrmr2:

dre3k:

nowinexile:

The last words said by Black youth murdered by policemen. 

This shit is chilling and made me tear up.

Sad

ophiucha:

theveganhooligan:

transcreature:

How to make cleavage

Reblogging this for all of my mtf sisters out there that might not know how to make a nice cleavage, this is a really great how-to. Check it out!

Signal boosting for my followers! :) Just remember, ladies and non-binary cleavage lovers, that those silicone bras can be tightened to a point where you can hurt yourself and you should avoid this. Try not to wear excessively tightened bras for more than a few hours at a time, take them off when you go to sleep, and if you begin to bruise or get rashes in the general bra area, don’t wear them for a few days. Also, if it hurts immediately, readjust!

I often see warnings about this for binders for the ftm crowd, but it’s important to remember that anything strapped tightly around your chest can cause harm and circulation issues. Stay safe, dearies, and look fabulous! 

lalondes:

i know there’s a lot going on right now but let’s please not forget that the steubenville rapist went free this week and is back on his high school’s varsity football team

ayothewuisback:

Oscar Grant breaks up a fight, gets arrested and shot in the back.

Eric Garner breaks up a fight, gets put in a chokehold and dies.

Unarmed Glenn Broadnax gets charged with assault when the police officers who shot at him missed.

Mike Brown gets shot and killed with his hands in the air.

Jonathan Ferrell is shot and killed while running to a police officer for help.

James Holmes lights up a movie theater and somehow makes it to a police car.

Something is wrong here.

rezondadawn:

Hey I’d like all my followers to check out this link an sign this petition.
If we can tweet an post about racism an police brutality then we sign an actually use our voices to usher in change an reform .
All my black brothers & sisters I urge you to share this !
It could be your brother , uncle , nephew , husband or friend .
https://www.change.org/petitions/president-barack-obama-please-enact-new-federal-laws-to-protect-citizens-from-police-violence-and-misconduct

rezondadawn:

Hey I’d like all my followers to check out this link an sign this petition.

If we can tweet an post about racism an police brutality then we sign an actually use our voices to usher in change an reform .

All my black brothers & sisters I urge you to share this !

It could be your brother , uncle , nephew , husband or friend .

https://www.change.org/petitions/president-barack-obama-please-enact-new-federal-laws-to-protect-citizens-from-police-violence-and-misconduct

coolvintagesoul:

I hope this sinks in your hearts.

brownpeopleproblems:

The Department of Foreign Affairs is “exploring options” about the best ways to deliver aid on the ground in Gaza – for example, “increasing the capacity” of local hospitals or sending Canadian doctors to Gaza, Hodge said.

He refused to say what specifically the government is doing to support injured children in Gaza or what these future plans entail.

"WOW CANADIAA IS SOO NICE!@!11!1!!!" ya okay 

(Source: smashedplantain)